SLIME is great for sensory play and children love it but it’s taking over my life!

I have an 11-year-old daughter which means that currently, slime has taken over my entire kitchen! When I open the fridge door, I am met with handwritten notes instructing me to “Please do not touch” and “Slime needs to be kept airtight.”

COOKING UP THE SLIME

Homemade slime seems to have taken on a life of its own in ordinary kitchens across the country. Blue slime, green slime, gooey slime, scented slime and my all time favourite glittery slime. The one thing they all have in common is the sheer delight and satisfaction that concocting them brings to my daughter and her friends; apparently, you can never have too much slime in your life!

A WORD OF CAUTION

There are endless recipes to choose from for making this glorious gloop on the internet/youtube. However, you should be aware that some children have received serious burns from the ingredients they have used in search of the ‘perfect’ slime. To avoid causing burns to the skin, you should avoid using borax (also known as sodium borate, sodium tetraborate or disodium).

With this in mind, here at What Do You Buy? we’ve done our own extensive research to find the safest and best recipe for slime – see below

ALL THE FUN OF SLIME WITHOUT THE MESS

If, however, you would like to bypass all the mess and stress of making slime yourself you can always buy some ready made slime for some ready made fun! Click on this link to Amazon to see their range of slimy products.

I have discovered that if you want to avoid a complete slime take-over from happening to you and your fridge, my daughter is very happy to take photos or make short videos of her creations to keep as a record to impress friends and family with!

SLIME AND VERY YOUNG CHILDREN

If you have much younger children who want to get in on the goo action but you are worried about them trying to taste the yummy looking stuff, then I would recommend replacing slime with ordinary, edible jelly. Spreading the colourful, slimy consistency over a tray or in a washing up bowl used to give my children enormous pleasure during their pre-school messy play sessions. (If you are feeling particularly adventurous you could also try out mash potato or baked beans!)

How to make the best safest gloopy slime in 5 easy steps

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STEP TWO

Grind the salt to a fine powder

STEP FOUR

Add glitter to the mixture, stir well then cover the mixture with a fine layer of the salt

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STEP ONE

Gather all of the ingredients:

  1. Elmer’s Washable Clear Glue
  2. Salt
  3. Water
  4. Glitter
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STEP THREE

Pour the glue into a bowl and add enough water to just cover the glue

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STEP FIVE

Cover the bowl with clingfilm and microwave for 30 seconds (the more mixture you make the longer this needs to be). Remove the clingfilm and let the mixture cool. Once cool spoon out the slime and start to squish and stretch it with your hands!

This video shows how we make slime with glue, water and salt without borax or liquid starch

ABOUT SENSORY PLAY

Of course, this type of sensory play and exploration is known for being extremely beneficial to children with more complex needs. However, during my time working alongside adults with learning disabilities, I noticed that some sensations and in particular the feeling of being messy could be distressing for some individuals. These liquid filled toys/objects may allow those not wanting to get dirty and sticky to still have the opportunity to engage with and enjoy a similar type of sensory play.

Sensory liquid floor tiles

The coloured liquid in each tile disperses when you put pressure on it forming unique new patterns. Ideal for use in sensory rooms or environments, the bright colours and ever changing shapes encourage visual stimulation as well as movement and touch.

Squishy Mesh Balls

These squishy balls are great for pressure release appliance or purely as a fun tactile toy

 

Sensory Bags

Take a look at this great idea for making your own sensory bags from Kiddy Crafty

Sensory Bags for kids using laminating pouches!